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22 year old aspiring crazy cat lady, vet tech, too much netflix.

(Source: mysteryarelife, via presto)

bunnyfood:

(via seri0uslybecca)

bunnyfood:

(via seri0uslybecca)

"The Seed" by Jooheng Tan (at San Diego Sand Sculpting Challenge)

"The Seed" by Jooheng Tan (at San Diego Sand Sculpting Challenge)

theanimalblog:

Close-up of a pink pelican (by Tambako the Jaguar)

theanimalblog:

Close-up of a pink pelican (by Tambako the Jaguar)

(via cataclysmicsoull)

(Source: invocado, via homofuck)

Missing this little stinker right now

Missing this little stinker right now

for-science-sake:

  1. Mossy Leaf-Tailed Gecko
  2. Grey Tree Frog 
  3. Grey Cicada 
  4. Casque head Chameleon 
  5. Lichen Spider
  6. Underwing Moth
  7. Peppered Moth
  8. Owl Fly Larva
  9. Eastern Screech Owl 

(via reptiglo)

How many consecutive 60-hour weeks can one work before one dies?

How many consecutive 60-hour weeks can one work before one dies?

Joywave: Tongues

macklebird:

tongues // joywave

(Source: countrywisher, via godh8sfags2)

bunnyfood:

(via mostlycatsmostly:Thomas Weiss)

bunnyfood:

(via mostlycatsmostly:Thomas Weiss)

(Source: smokindick, via brosnakes)

(Source: realizes, via europeantime)

earthlynation:

Bothriopsis pulchra (by d.mideros)

earthlynation:

Bothriopsis pulchra (by d.mideros)

(via fuckyeahherpetology)

Q&A

you support zoo's? Why? koreanbeefstew

naturepunk:

I support accredited zoos, not roadside menageries and private collections. I have written extensively on this topic before, but here’s the gist of it, copied and pasted: 

I take a lot of photos of wild animals living in zoos. People often look at my work and ask, “If you’re for animal welfare, why do you support these zoos?” 

My answer is this:

Zoos can be both a blessing and a curse. Many zoos in the world today make their money by exploiting their animals for human entertainment. But others exist for the purpose of perpetuating conservation and education, and, in many ways, could be the ONLY way to save certain species from extinction. 

What LOT of people don’t understand is that in the United States, zoos can become accredited by an organization known as the AZA, the American Association of Zoos and Aquariums. They operate to establish a new standard for zoos, focusing on breeding programs and advances in animal care tactics. All zoos accredited by the AZA must meet a series a grueling standards, including proper enclosure size, exceptional animal care and husbandry, and a focus on conservation. 

These AZA zoos have established a program called the Species Survival Plan, which focuses on increasing the genetic diversity of captive zoo animals. An increased genetic diversity is VITAL to keeping a species alive, specially if the species comes from just a small population of breeding founders. 

AZA animals are NOT taken from the wild; they are the descendants of breeding stock which was captured more than 80 years ago. The only exception to this rule is for animals which are in need of rescue, and which cannot be released back into the wild. 

The Oregon Zoo, for example, houses several birds of prey which are the victims of car collisions and attempted poaching, all of which are not fit to survive in the wild. They also have a mountain lion which was rescued as an orphan (who is now the proud mother of the very first cougar cub born at an AZA zoo in 15 years). 

Through the efforts of the Species Survival Plan, many rare and endangered animals are now facing a brighter future. Using captive specimens, biologists increase wild populations. The recent boom in of California condor numbers can be almost entirely credited to the efforts of AZA zoos who work in conjunction with the US Fish and Wildlife Service to release captive-raised birds into their native habitats. 

Likewise, it gives scientists an opportunity to learn from animals without having to disturb them in the wild. A prime example would be the case of a biologist studying elephants at the Oregon Zoo, trying to figure out how the giants communicated over vast distances. One day, while taking notes, she noticed that she could feel a very slight tremor travel through the concrete floor. This lead to the discovery of something remarkable: Elephants could communicate by emitting low-frequency rumbles which traveled for miles through the ground without making any sound at all. This is how many elephants communicate in the wild in what seems to be an otherwise silent manner.

If you enjoy zoos, but are not sure which ones to support and which to stay away from, do what I do: ONLY support AZA-accredited zoos and registered non-profit rescues centers. Avoid non-accredited zoos, and any rescue center which is not a registered non-profit. All AZA zoos will state their affiliation with the AZA and the Species Survival Plan on their websites, so you can look them up before you even leave your house.

Hope this helps! 

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